Monthly archive

April 2013

The Warriors Aren’t Dead Yet

in NBA by

When David Lee went down with a hip injury in game one, the Warriors were facing six point deficit with about 11 minutes left in the game. In the league’s most hostile arena and without one of their key offensive cogs, the Warriors were staring at an uphill battle to take home what had appeared to be a very winnable game up until the moment that Lee went down riving in pain.

To my surprise, the Nuggets were never able to land a knockout punch on the Warriors, and Golden State was able to hang around. When Stephen Curry drilled a three with 14 seconds left to tie the game, I thought for sure the game was going to overtime. But then the Warriors had another horrible break go against them: Andre Miller weaved his way around Draymond Green, who graded out as one of the best one-on-one defenders in the league this year, and banked home the game-winning shot with no time remaining, capping off a surreal 28 point night (18 in the fourth) for someone that scored more than 20 points just three times this season.

Losing to the Nuggets under those circumstances has to be a killer, mostly because there was a real shot for the Warriors to win a game against a team that never loses at home, only a 37-year old point guard that has never been a great shooter was knocking down everything he looked at. Assuming Denver’s other players would step up in game two and factoring in the loss of Lee, stealing one of the first two games of the series, which is generally considered to be a must for a true underdog to have a shot, seemed extremely unlikely.

But the Warriors didn’t let that belief slip into their minds; Mark Jackson’s best attribute as a coach is his ability to galvanize his team, and he had his men believing that their season wasn’t close to the brink just yet. Equally important to Golden State’s collective belief in themselves is the adjustment that Jackson made to his starting line-up in order to replace Lee. In game one, Jackson called upon Carl Landry to replace Lee for the majority of the fourth quarter, but rather than sticking with him as the new starting power forward, Jackson got with the times and went small, inserting Jarrett Jack into the starting line-up, sliding Klay Thompson down to small forward and Harrison Barnes into the unfamiliar role of stretch four big.

Golden State’s starting line-up of Jack, Curry, Thompson, Barnes and Andrew Bogut played 20 minutes last night while no other Warrior line-up was on the floor for more than five minutes. That starting unit was ridiculously effective for the Warriors, scoring 122.1 points per 100 possessions while holding the Nuggets to just 83.9 points per 100 possessions (small sample size alert, but that’s a net rating of +38.2 points per 100 possessions). Collectively the group shot 62% from the field and 55% from three and they more than held their own on the board because of the presence of Bogut and the superb effort of Barnes.

Barnes was tremendous for the Warriors last night, providing additional spacing to their offense, competing defensively, making an impact on the boards, knocking down some open shots and even providing the Warriors with some one-on-one offense. The Warriors put Barnes in the Kobe or Carmelo areas on the floor on the wing and asked him to attack the defense at an angle. Whether he was matched up against a smaller player because a switched pick-and-roll or was simply facing off against a Denver big man because the Warriors were playing small, Barnes gave the Warriors a few very important buckets out of isolation sets.

barnes1

Here’s an example of the Warriors giving the ball to Barnes on the deep wing and clearing out for him to work. He’s got Anthony Randolph on him here, so he uses his speed advantage on the big man to get by him. He uses a jab step, drawing Randolph a bit closer to him, and drives with his left hand towards the basket.

barnes2

Barnes gets a great deal of separation from Randolph as he begins his drive, and with Carl Landry screening off Kenneth Faried from helping, Barnes has an open path to the rim. That said, Randolph is an incredible athlete himself, and he actually recovers pretty well on this drive and gets in good position to block Barnes’ shot attempt, but the rookie forward was having none of it, switching up his dunk in mid-air to uncork one of the nastiest reverse jams you’ll ever see.

This slam came in a big spot. Corey Brewer had just a hit a three to bring Denver back within 10 and the Nuggets looked to be putting something together. But every time they made progress last night, the Warriors had an answer.

It is important to note that Barnes’ emergence as a stellar small ball four and the team’s success without Lee doesn’t mean that Lee isn’t a valuable part of this team. Though he may be the worst defensive player in the league, he’s one of the most dynamic bigs in the NBA, and his ability to do just about everything from the elbows makes Golden State’s offense flow at an elite level. In this particular case, though, with the Nuggets starting traditional small forward Wilson Chandler at the four and possessing enough length and athleticism to deter Lee’s effectiveness, Barnes is a better option. The Nuggets ignored Barnes as a spot-up shooter in game one, but he may have earned a bit of their respect in this one, and if the Nuggets start paying any attention to him, that opens up more space for the Warriors’ other offensive weapons to operate.

And when you get guys like Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson space, they are going to make you pay big time. I love watching the Warriors play because their playbook is full of some off-ball goodies that they use to free up Curry and Thompson for open jumpers. Take a look at this set that the Warriors used late in the third quarter last night.

Curry1

Golden State is going to make Denver’s defense work with this simultaneous action at both elbows. On one side, they’ll cross screen for Curry, and on the other there is a pindown screen for Draymond Green.

Curry2

But instead of using the pindown, Green simply shifts down to the block, followed by Landry, who will set a staggered screen for Curry to come off and catch the ball for a three-pointer in the corner.

Curry3

The staggered screen works, as both Corey Brewer and Andre Iguodala are in the paint and not in a position to get to Curry. Anthony Randolph has to be stepping out here and putting a hand in the passing lane, but he doesn’t appear to be aware that the best shooter on the planet is about to be wide open from three. Randolph eventually reacts, but it’s too late to prevent the red hot Curry from getting a clean look at the rim.

Thompson did not seem to be the beneficiary of many open looks off set plays last night, which makes his 8-of-11 shooting performance (5-of-6 from three) even more impressive. Thompson was able to have such a good game without getting open off Golden State’s sets because he’s one of the most intuitive players in the league and he is always working to find the open spot on the floor. Whether he’s running to the line in transition, getting himself open off an offensive rebound or simply reading the help defense and sliding to the open spot, Thompson is always sneakily finding ways to get open.

klay1

Here the Warriors are running some of their standard simultaneous action with Curry on one side and Thompson on the other. The result of this play is going to be a Jack drive, but where the play is made is when Thompson cuts across the baseline to get to the left corner.

klay2

Jack times his drive perfectly (he may not have been doing this on purpose, but I’d like to think so). As Thompson runs across the paint his man, Brewer, sees the Jack drive and decides not to stay with Thompson but to instead stay in the paint to provide help on the drive. Jack sees all of the help defenders in the paint for the Nuggets and adjusts his shot mid-air, swinging the ball out to Thompson for a wide open three. This shot was huge, too, as the Nuggets had just gotten the lead down to single digits.

klay3

Here we have Thompson reading the help defense. Brewer is taught to have a foot in the paint to contest this Curry drive. If Thompson were to stand still, Brewer could do a pretty good job getting in Curry’s passing lane and recovering to Thompson if Curry decided to pass. But Thompson realizes this and will fade to the corner, something Curry knows because it’s exactly what he’d do.

klay4

That’s too easy for Thompson.

***

With the amount of offensive firepower that the Warriors have on the perimeter – not to mention a very solid playmaker in Jack that can also hit open shots and a big man in Bogut that can facilitate from the post or elbow and make an impact downlow – you can’t count out this Golden State team even if they’ve lost one of their better players. The Nuggets are a putrid outside shooting team (and we’ve seen the Warriors go zone more than a few times in the first two games), so the Warriors are going to have a chance in every game if Curry and Thompson simply have average days.

The injury to Lee may have put a damper on the Warriors getting any further than the second round, but against an equally banged up Nuggets team that needed a miracle night from Andre Miller to break even at home in this series, they have a shot.

Playoff Roundup: Day 1

in NBA by
andremiller

For my recap of the Boston-New York game, click here.

Nuggets 97, Warriors 95

– The story of the game and the story of the day was Andre Miller. The the 37-year old veteran one-upped his future nursing home buddy Jason Kidd, who had a couple of big fourth quarter steals against the Celtics, by completely taking over the game in the fourth quarter and willing in the Nuggets to victory while everybody else on the team struggled offensively. Miller used every move in his arsenal to put points on the board for the Nuggets, and when it came time to win the game, with the score tied at 95 with 15 seconds left, George Karl called on his 13 year vet to make the game-winning play, and Miller delivered.

Denver’s set-up on the final play of the game. (Image via NBA/ESPN)

– The Nuggets looked to be going to one of their most reliable plays: a pick-and-fade with Wilson Chandler at the top of the key. You could see Chandler looking over at the bench at around the eight second mark, likely asking the coaches whether or not he should start moving towards the middle of the court then. But Harrison Barnes held Chandler up a bit, which forced Miller to go into isolation mode. Instead of panicking or settling for a jumper against a defensive player that held his man to sub-30% shooting on isolations this season, Miller carefully weaved his way around Draymond Green for the game-winning lay-up with 1.2 seconds left. An underrated part of this shot was the defense that Denver played about 20 second earlier. They shut down a play Golden State was running to get either Stephen Curry or Klay Thompson an open look and forced Jarrett Jack to pick up his dribble at the same time. With both Curry and Thompson covered and Jack with no live dribble, he was forced to call the Warriors final timeout, which sealed their fate after Miller made the lay-up.

– Miller finished with 28 points, five assists and three rebounds while shooting 11-of-16 from the field. It didn’t seem to matter what Miller did when he had the ball because he was so good at making his shots any time he got a clean look at the rim. There were those classic old-man game post-ups – even one against 6’8″ small forward Harrison Barnes, whom Miller promptly backed all the way down to the paint and schooled with an up-and-under move – there were pick-and-rolls that gave Miller open looks from the mid-range and there was that crucial drive at the end of regulation that capped off a brilliant playoff performance from one of the game’s most under-appreciated players.

– The Warriors have to feel awful about losing that game. With Kenneth Faried out, this was a game that they desperately needed to steal in order to have a shot in this series, and they even held the lead for the majority of the game. They can look forward to Stephen Curry shaking off the jitters of his first post-season game to come back better in game two, but something tells me that the Nuggets aren’t going to be flirting with another home defeat after yesterday. As if losing a playoff game because of a game-winning isolation lay-up to a 37-year old wasn’t enough, losing David Lee was just insult to injury.

deron

Brooklyn Nets 106, Chicago Bulls 89

– Deron Williams’ return to form has been a major storyline over the second half of the season and Williams looked like his elite level self in Brooklyn’s first ever playoff game. Williams was hitting his outside shot, beating his man off the dribble and creating for others any time he had the chance. If Williams is going to consistently play at this level again, then the Nets take a step up as a team. I’m not sure if that puts them on the same level as the Knicks as serious contenders against the Heat, but they are certainly not going to be an easy out.

Deron Williams blows by his man and gets a clear lane to the rim. (Image via NBA/ESPN)

– This was one of my favorite plays of the night. Here Williams is able to isolate against Marco Belinelli and beat him off the dribble,which forces Nazr Mohammed to rotate over to stop his drive.

Carlos Boozer is not exactly helping the helper. (Image via NBA/ESPN)

As Mohammed slides over, Brook Lopez cuts at the perfect time to receive a beautiful dropoff pass from Williams for an easy flush.

– Speaking of Lopez, the chemistry that he and Williams showed in this game was tremendous, and Lopez was pretty good by himself at creating offense on the block. It helped that Joakim Noah was limited and unable to defense Lopez like he normally would, but you really have to credit Lopez for growing his game and becoming the most complete offensive player in the league on the block (outside of Tim Duncan, of course). When Williams and Lopez can operate an effective two-man game and the Nets can get points from Lopez on the block, they are a great offensive team, and if they can step up their defense at the right moments, they are dangerous.

– The Bulls’ organization should be ashamed for having Joakim Noah on the floor in the second half of this game. To have him start the game to see if he could go is one thing, and once he went out after a six minute run and didn’t return, I assumed he was done for the day. Instead, he returned to start the second half in a 20-point game and seemed to have further injured himself on the first play – and he still came back in for five more minutes! It’s unfathomable why the Bulls would allow one of their franchise centerpieces to risk serious injury, particularly when you are down 20 points.

Knicks Grind Out Game 1 Win Over Boston

in NBA by
uspw_7284284

Just four minutes into the first game of the 2013 post-season, it appeared as if we were in for a hell of a performance from one of the games brightest stars in Carmelo Anthony. Anthony drilled four straight shots, including two threes, to fire up the Garden right out of the gate, and it seemed like Carmelo, who finished off the season on a white hot tear that earned him the scoring title, was in for a historic afternoon.

Instead, after Doc Rivers called a TV timeout following Carmelo’s fourth consecutive make, Boston ramped up their defensive effort against Carmelo, and Anthony shot 9-for-25 to closeout the game. The Celtics sent several different defenders at Carmelo, with Avery Bradley, Jeff Green, Paul Pierce and Brandon Bass all getting shots to stop him. Boston relied on these individual defenders to slow down Melo so that they could stay at home on New York’s shooters and force Anthony to play hero ball.

This gameplan worked perfectly for the Celtics, who got the Knicks out of their free flowing pick-and-roll offense and got them bogged down in a one-on-one show with Anthony trying to hard to get his points out of isolation. Boston played him straight up while overloading the strongside of the floor; they didn’t send doubles at Carmelo, but they made it so he couldn’t have an easy look at the rim no matter what he did, and Anthony wasn’t making the right reads as far as swinging the ball and trying to break down Boston’s rotations.

New York has gotten away with Anthony playing hero ball a lot this season, but Brandon Bass did an exemplary job of keeping Carmelo in front of him and all of Boston’s defenders contested his pull-up shots well. Anthony can make some of the shots he missed in this game, but he had an off game from the field, and you have to credit Boston’s defense for doing everything necessary to give him fits.

While New York’s offense struggled after that initial Anthony outburst, Boston’s offense looked very good with Paul Pierce going into the post and facilitating from there. There was a two minute stretch in the second quarter when the Celtics went to Pierce on the right block three straight times and each time Bradley sliced down the middle and received a perfect pass for a lay-up. Boston utilized off ball movement and the smarts of Pierce and Garnett to manufacture good looks for their teammates. And when high percentage looks weren’t there, Jeff Green was there to bail out the offense with a three-pointer or an aggressive drive to the rim.

Things would improve gradually for the Knicks in the second half as Mike Woodson made subtle adjustments to help get his team back on track. It started with the early hook for Chris Copeland, whom the Knicks tried to get involved in the offense with some token post-ups, but he wasn’t effective against a tuned in Boston defense. J.R. Smith came in for Copeland and immediately provided some offensive relief with a pull-up jumpshot.

Then, in the fourth quarter, Woodson made two key decisions and inserted two players that will be getting AARP letters in the mail not too long after this season into the crunchtime line-up for good.

Jason Kidd and Kenyon Martin, who played together in another lifetime with the New Jersey Nets, gave the Knicks excellent minutes down the stretch of this game and helped turn the tide in favor of the Knicks when Boston had previously established control of the game.

Kidd baited Green into this turnover by acting like was going to double him.

Kidd had been good in the first half, knocking down a couple of threes and moving the ball around the perimeter, but in the fourth quarter he came up with so many huge defensive plays. Whether it was sagging off his man just enough to show Jeff Green a double before shooting into the passing lane and stealing the ball or taking on Paul Pierce in one-on-one assignments, Kidd was tremendous defensively and those extra possessions were crucial to the Knicks in a grind-it-out battle like this. Kidd had three steals in the fourth quarter, and each one helped swing the momentum of the game.

Martin is able to roll freely to the rim because of New York’s tremendous spacing.

With Chandler clearly ailing, Woodson called on Martin, who was just returning from injury himself, to anchor the defense as the center and to open up things on offense as the pick-and-roll big man, and he delivered. Martin was excellent on the defensive side of the floor, protecting the rim and helping clean up the offensive glass for a Knicks’ squad that is used to having a defensive player of the year in the middle in crunchtime. Martin was also key offensively; though he is a limited offensive player, he’s a capable finisher at the rim, and simply rolling hard to the rim forces Boston’s defense to drop down to account for him, which opens up the floor for New York’s shooters.

You can see in the image above how Boston is in a dilmna on this 1/5 pick-and-roll by the Knicks. Martin is rolling hard and fast to the rim, but Pierce would be taking a risk to leave Melo wide open in the corner. Boston’s best chance of stopping this play is Brandon Bass and Bradley getting in the passing lane and stopping Felton from getting it to Martin. That didn’t happen, though, and Martin threw down an emphatic slam to top off one of New York’s few successful pick-and-roll plays on the day.

The Knicks are going to have to clean up things with their offense, mainly getting the ball up the floor quickly and starting their offense sooner into the shot clock than they did against Boston. They’ll also have to make sure their offense never goes into the long lulls they experienced today when the only thing they did was throw it to Carmelo and expect him to make a contested shot. But this was overall an encouraging win for New York. They were forced to play Boston’s style of game, had an injured Chandler and got an awful shooting performance from Anthony (though he did have 36 points) and still managed to pull out the win.

Boston will have to go back to the drawing board offensively. Their defense was stellar, and though the Knicks will certainly play much less hero ball in game two, I expect Boston to hold New York well below their season average offensive efficiency. Turnovers were the story for Boston in this one and their sloppy passing is what did them in. They had 21 total team turnovers that led to 20 Knick points, which is a lofty sum in a game like this when the Knicks rarely got good looks in the half-court. Pierce and Green each had six turnovers apiece and Bradley added four cough ups; simple things like entry passes were constantly screwed up in this game by the Celtics, and if they’re to have any chance of winning this series, they’ll have to be able to take care of the ball.

NBA Playoffs Liveblog: Day 1

in NBA by
celticsknicks

Join me and Demarcus Robinson as we liveblog the first day of the 2013 NBA Playoffs!

Mark Travis - 4:34 PM ET

Demarcus is here to help me out with the Warriors-Nuggets game. With Faried injured and likely out, I’m picking Golden State to steal this game and to win the series in six, mostly because I want to feel what it’s like to root for Stephen Curry.

Mark Travis - 4:33 PM ET

Tremendous win for the Knicks. Almost everything went wrong for them – horrid offensive execution, Tyson Chandler being hurt, Carmelo’s off night – and they still beat Boston at their own game. I’m starting on my recap of the game now.

Mark Travis - 4:26 PM ET

Tremendous play from Jason Kidd has helped the Knicks secure a seven point lead with 1:21 left in the game. Kidd has been everywhere defensively and the Knicks have been able to hit some big shots while the Celtics have gone cold on the offensive end.

Mark Travis - 4:06 PM ET

The Knicks’ effort level has taken a step up in the fourth. They sense that Boston is not going to beat themselves and that they must play better in order to beat them. New York needs to continue to trust their pick-and-roll attack and try and swing the ball to get good looks. It is much better to get Carmelo a three point look off of a few swing passes than it is to give him the ball and ask him to take the shot off the dribble.

I expect Boston to go to some Paul Pierce/Kevin Garnett pick-and-roll action here with either one of them getting a post-up off the action.

Mark Travis - 3:57 PM ET

Boston takes a three-point lead into the fourth quarter. The Knicks did a little bit better job of getting their pick-and-roll action going in the third, but it still wasn’t enough. The Knicks need to get into their flow offense and start swinging the ball to get good looks on basically every possession instead of relying on isolation plays.

Mark Travis - 3:31 PM ET

Mike Woodson didn’t waste much time to put J.R. Smith into the game to give his offense a boost. Boston has been so awesome on defense in this game and the Knicks haven’t been able to generate any space with Felton running things and Melo being the only other player on the floor capable of creating his own shot. Smith changes that and just nailed a pull-up jumper to give the Knicks the lead again. This is a good timeout by Doc; Boston’s offense needs to get back into rhythm.

Mark Travis - 3:12 PM ET

The Celtics look like the better team right now. Their offensive execution is solid and they are taking advantage of every transition opportunity they’ve gotten while the Knicks’ offense has devolved into Carmelo isolations. Boston is pressuring the ball and forcing the Knicks to start their offense so late in the clock and all New York is doing is giving the ball to Carmelo and getting out of the way. That strategy is not working with Brandon Bass defending him. Bass was tremendous against LeBron James in the Eastern Conference Finals last year and he’s been great on Carmelo. He’s not making anything easy for Anthony and he’s only gotten blown by once by the more athletic Anthony.

This was a great half for Boston because they’ve proven to themselves that they’ll be able to stop the Knicks and score at a decent clip. When the Celtics aren’t getting their offense from Paul Pierce posting up, it’s Jeff Green being really aggressive that has fueled their attack. Green has 20 points on 10 shots at the half while Pierce and Garnett have only combined to shoot 14 times (their major contribution has been their 10 combined assists).

Boston has a 53-49 lead at halftime. New York is going to have to come out of the lockerroom ready to execute their offense rather than dumping it down to Carmelo every play. If they continue to play ISO ball, Boston is going to steal this game.

Mark Travis - 2:53 PM ET

The Celtics are just posting Paul Pierce up on every possession and burning the Knicks with cuts from the weakside because their rotations aren’t crisp. On three straight plays Avery Bradley has dove right down the lane from the perimeter and received a pass from Pierce for an easy lay-up. Boston’s offense has more fluidity to it than New York’s does right now, mostly because the Knicks are isolating Carmelo instead of getting pick-and-roll action going.

Mark Travis - 2:42 PM ET

Jeff Green has been tremendous for the Celtics this game, knocking down threes, playing good defense at attacking in the half-court. He had given the Celtics a six point lead before Jason Kidd led the Knicks back into the lead with a 9-0 run by hitting two threes and assisting on a triple by Iman Shumpert.

Mark Travis - 2:32 PM ET

Once the initial shock of Carmelo’s start wore off, the Celtics outclassed the Knicks on both ends of the floor and end up with a 29-26 lead at the end of the first thanks to a buzzer beating three by Jeff Green. Boston is working their offense and getting good looks and their defense is forcing the Knicks into some tough shots. New York can’t settle for deep twos if they want to beat Boston’s defense.

Mark Travis - 2:23 PM ET

J.R. Smith just threw down a thunderous dunk off a pick-and-roll. When Smith aggressively turns the corner off high ball screens instead of settling for pull-up jumpers the Knicks’ offense is even tougher to guard. Smith presents a different set of challenges than Felton because he can make the outside shot and finish over size in the paint.

Mark Travis - 2:19 PM ET

Two first quarter fouls on Avery Bradley is huge. He’s been tremendous defensively for Boston and he’s grown to be a solid outside shooter and secondary pick-and-roll guy.

Mark Travis - 2:09 PM ET

Carmelo Anthony, ladies and gentlemen! What a start from one of the league’s deadliest scorers. He’s four-of-four from the field and he’s drilled three contested jumpers already (two of which were threes). Boston is running some nice off-ball action to get the ball into Kevin Garnett and Paul Piece, but they aren’t going to win a shootout with the Knicks if Carmelo gets going.

Mark Travis - 2:04 PM ET

Pablo Prigioni has been a solid rotation player for the Knicks this season, but Chris Copeland starting against a Boston team that starts a big line-up with Paul Pierce and Jeff Green on the wings is not a bad thing. Copeland has been pretty good himself this season, too.

Mark Travis - 2:01 PM ET

Hello everybody! While we are here to cover the NBA playoffs today, I’d like to extend our collective thoughts and prayers to the people of Boston and the family and friends of the victims of the tragedies that have taken place in and around the city over the past week.

The Boston Marathon bombings certainly have an impact of some kind on this series, as the Cetlics, who are already one of the most prideful teams in the league, will have a ton of motivation in this series. While Boston will certainly come out with a ton of fire, the Knicks are a superior team, specifically offensively, and I think the new version of Carmelo Anthony is one extremely capable of taking his team on a deep playoff run.

My pick for this series is the Knicks in six games. Now, let’s get the playoffs underway!

Justin Upton’s Remarkable Start to 2013

in MLB by
http://www.trbimg.com/img-5165bb02/turbine/sfl-miami-marlins-homer-problems-blog-20130410-001/600/600x438

What has gotten into Justin Upton?

The 25-year-old Atlanta Braves outfielder is off to arguably the best start in all of Major League Baseball this season, and maybe we are finally getting to see the potential that we all knew he had.

Let me put this into a little bit of perspective just in case you haven’t been tracking this campaign. So far, the Atlanta Braves have played 15 games. Over that time, Justin Upton has nine home runs. I know that it is virtually impossible to maintain this pace over an entire campaign, but if he was able to, he would completely demolish Barry Bonds’ single-season home run record by slamming 97 home runs.

On top of that, he has driven in 13 runs so far. Again, if we extrapolate this over the entire season, he would end up with 140 RBI.

This is the type of production that the Atlanta Braves were hoping for when they dealt for Upton this off-season. Last season was a bit of a struggle for him, and that was what made this trade possible. Generally, five-tool 24-year-olds are given all the time in the world to develop, but I have to admit that I was a little bit confused as to his aggressive sale.

Of course, he only hit 17 home runs and drove in 63 runs all of that year. His average dipped down to .280, and I think the fact that that potential I already mentioned was not shining through eventually frustrated the Arizona Diamondbacks.

What is interesting is that in 2011 hit .289 with 31 home runs and 88 RBI. Of course, having a down year is less than desirable, but he was only one year removed from an excellent season. For a young player in his mid-20s, that is often times to be expected.

Regardless of what Arizona was thinking at the time, the Atlanta Braves are certainly cashing in on this trade right now. There is no doubt that he will cool off, but for right now, it will be fun to see how far he can take this.

Who Is on Top of Baseball on April 12?

in MLB by
Courtesy of: http://www.kffl.com//images/media/paul-maholm-580x316-20120907.jpg

Right now, who do you think is the best team in Major League Baseball?

Personally, I think that there is a very clear top three, and we’re going to talk about those today.

3. Oakland Athletics (8-2)

I know that Oakland Athletics have grabbed six of their wins at the hands of the floundering Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and the incredibly strikeout-happy Houston Astros, so you might want to discount what they have done so far.

However, that is significant on one level. These teams will be the ones that the Athletics will see the most throughout the season because they are in the same division, so this dominance is a good sign for the future.

The team has had surprising performances from Jed Lowrie and Brandon Moss. These men have hit five home runs and driven in 18 runs combined over the first 10 games.

On the mound, most of the staff has been outstanding. The bullpen has been particularly solid, and Chris Resop, Sean Doolittle and Jerry Blevins have combined to pitch 13.2 shutout innings so far this year.

Despite a lower strength of schedule, Oakland looks great this year.

2. San Francisco Giants (7-3)

Remember a few years ago when we all thought that Barry Zito was down for the count? He is off to a great start for the San Francisco Giants this year. He has pitched 14 shutout innings so far, and while I would say that is the most impressive achievement so far, the rest of this staff is doing a great job as well.

On offense, there seems to be kind of a triple threat going on. Angel Pagan, Pablo Sandoval and Hunter Pence are serving as key run producers. Combined, they have scored 17 runs and driven in 21.

This team will probably see a challenge from the Los Angeles Dodgers by the end of the season, but if they keep playing like they have been, they are in a good position.

1. Atlanta Braves (8-1)

Last season, the general consensus was that the Atlanta Braves were an excellent bet for the future. They were loaded with young talent then, and they added BJ and Justin Upton to the outfield this winter.

BJ is struggling so far, but Justin has six home runs in nine games with a .353 batting average. Also highlighting the offense has been the outstanding rookie (as well as surprising story) Evan Gattis. He has three home runs and six RBI in six games so far, and it seems as if the absence of Brian McCann has not been nearly as painful as it might be.

Their pitching staff has been incredible. Four of their seven bullpen pitchers have ERAs of 0.00 so far, and Paul Maholm has also not allowed a run over two starts and 12.2 innings. The Atlanta Braves have historically been known for their pitching, and that is the main reason they are on top of my ranking right now.

The Likable Red Sox?

in MLB by
redsox

For years, the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox have been the evil empires of baseball. They put together the best teams by outspending their competition, they get featured on national TV on a bi-weekly basis despite playing four hour snooze fests and the majority of their marquee players have been steroid users. I think we can universally agree that watching a team like the San Fransisco Giants win two of the past three World Series is much easier on the soul than watching the Yankees or Red Sox pile up the pennants.

But last year things started to change. There was a massive shift in the American League East, with the Red Sox and Yankees trending downwards and the Orioles, Rays and even Blue Jays moving in the right direction thanks to things like building a farm system, excellent scouting and smart managing. You know, only the total opposite way of building a franchise compared to how the Red Sox and Yankees succeeded.

The Red Sox took it harder than the Yankees, with the hiring of Bobby Valentine and the whole beer and chicken fiasco combining to create enough chaos that it forced Theo Epstein to want to work for the Cubs, Kevin Youkilis to want to work for the Yankees and left the team barren of talented players outside of guys like Dustin Pedroia and Jacoby Ellsbury (who are both coming off of down years).

For the first time in over a decade, the Blue Jays, Orioles and Rays were all favored to finish better than the Red Sox and Yankees prior to the start of this season, as the evil empires of the American League were expected to go through a down year. It’s easy to see why this was the most common prognostication for the division. The Orioles were tremendous last season and have a cast of young stars, Tampa has been consistently competitive over the past handful of years and the Blue Jays had one of the best off-seasons in baseball by adding Cy Young award winner R.A. Dickey, superstar Jose Reyes and useful regulars like Emilio Bonifacio and Melky Cabrera.

Meanwhile, the Yankees entered this season with a litany of injuries to their best players and the Red Sox were relying heavily on guys like Jackie Bradley Jr. and Will Middlebrooks. From a talent standpoint, all three of the AL East’s former underdogs have an advantage over Boston and New York.

But over the first week of the season, I found myself gravitating to the Red Sox for some reason. I had previously disliked the Red Sox because I tend to root for the underdog and they were always buying their way to success. But now the roles are reversed. Now it’s Boston that has all of the odds stacked against them with a cast of players looking to prove themselves and a division filled with tough opponents to overcome. And it’s always easier to fall for a team when they have someone like rookie Jackie Bradley Jr. there to pull you in.

Boston took a risk this season by deciding to keep Bradley with the big league club to start the year, and it paid off immediately when he burst onto the scene in Boston’s opening series against the Yankees. For a player that got all of two hits in that series, Bradley still made an impression on fans because he had a keen eye, a virtue that very few young players come into the league with. Bradley drew three walks on opening day and has five on the season so far, and he’s captivating the Red Sox fan base even though he’s not often making contact with the ball.

Bradley’s outfield mates – Ellsbury and off-season acquisition Shane Victorino – are also easy players to root for.

Ellsbury was legitimately in the conversation as one of the handful of best players in baseball a year ago before his season was derailed by injuries. We can only hope that Ellsbury is able to get back to his usual self at some point this season, because when all facets of his game are working – the great plate approach, the surprising power, the tremendous defense and the blazing speed – he’s one of the funnest players in the game to watch.

Victorino has always been a fun player to watch, too, because it’s clear he’s always giving it his all. He’s been a pretty consistent 3-4 WAR player since he became an everyday regular in Philly, with the one outlier being his 5.7 WAR campaign in 2011 when he slugged a career high .491 and posted a career high 133 wRC+ (weight runs created). Some have criticized Victorino’s defense in recent years, but his advanced metrics (UZR and UZR/150) have stayed above average and if he can get back to being a .280/.350/.450 hitter, he’ll likely give the Red Sox a 3-4 WAR return on their off-season investment.

Then there is Will Middlebrooks, the second year third baseman that lit up the Blue Jays on Sunday to the tune of three homeruns (and he hit a flyball to the warning track in his final at-bat). Middlebrooks showed flashes of being a solid everyday player last year – he had a .288/.325/.509 slash line with 15 homers and 1.9 WAR – and he’s looking like an even more dangerous hitter this season.

The pitching staff lacks that power arm or strikeout savant that is fun to watch take the hill every five days, but Jon Lester is at an important point in his career as he tries to bounce back from his disaster 2012 season, and he’s off to a good start (2-0, 1.50 ERA, 13 Ks) and I think the combination of Andrew Bailey and Joel Hanrahan in the bullpen has the potential to be one of the better 8th-9th inning combos in the league. And we can only hope that Daniel Bard makes his way back to the big leagues with his confidence with him, because he’s was one of the game’s best relief pitchers before he began his transition to a starting role.

The Red Sox have started off the year 5-2 with series wins over the Yankees and Blue Jays and a 3-1 victory over the Orioles yesterday. After they finish their home series with Baltimore, Boston will travel to Tampa Bay for a four game series with the Rays. By the end of next week, the Red Sox will have one through a series with each and every one of their division opponents, and there is a good chance that they will emerge from their opening stretch with a winning record and potentially with a spot at the top of the division.

The tables have turned for the Red Sox this season. They’ve gone from cursed to a traditional power to a laughing stock during my lifetime and now they’ve entered a new phase as underdogs in the American League East. And now that the perception of them as favorites is gone, I find them an easy team to root for because of their talented and enjoyable personnel. I’m sure that once this lull in the franchise’s history is complete or the team is sold that Boston will be back to their bullying ways in the free agent market, but for now I will enjoy this scrappy bunch as they fight an uphill battle for a playoff spot.

The Evolution Of The Knicks

in NBA by
smithanthony

Perhaps a more accurate title for this column is “The Evolution Of The Knicks That Were Once Nuggets,” because that’s the trio of players that has revitalized an injury plagued season for New York and has the Knicks looking as strong as ever as the post-season approaches.

After going through an injury plagued stretch during the middle portion of the season, the Knicks have regained the hot touch that they started the season with and they are on a 12-game winning streak that has included wins over the Jazz, Celtics (twice), Bucks, Grizzlies, Thunder and 1/3rd of the Heat.

Over this 12 game span, the Knicks are scoring at a ridiculous 118.0 points 100 possessions rate that would lead the league by a mile over the course of a full season (Miami currently leads the league with a 110.5 offensive rating). Perhaps more importantly than the Knicks’ resurgent offense is the fact that their scoring explosions are being accompanied by solid defense. New York was allowing just 101.2 points per 100 possessions during this stretch until yesterday’s barn burner against the Thunder, a slight improvement over their season mark that would rank just behind the Hawks’ 10th rank defense for the season.

The return of Carmelo Anthony has been the biggest reason for the surge, with all but one of the 12 wins coming with Anthony back in the line-up. Anthony has comeback refreshed and on a mission, and he’s making a very strong push to end Kevin Durant’s streak of scoring titles. Here are Anthony’s scoring performances over the last 11 games: 21, 37, 28, 29, 22, 32, 24, 50, 40,41, 36. These last four games have been absolutely brilliant scoring displays that showcased Anthony’s incredible shotmaking ability.

This season we’ve seen Anthony make subtle improvements to his game that I feel have launched him into superstar territory.

With the advancement of statistics, the public perception of Anthony has changed dramatically over the course of his career. When he was putting up huge numbers during his first few years in Denver, we marveled at his scoring ability. But as efficiency stats became more prevalent over the past couple of years and his defensive deficiencies became a bigger talking point, Anthony dropped out of the elite player conversation.

But, like our view of the game, Anthony has evolved, and the criticisms that the age of analytics have heaped on him are not totally accurate anymore. Anthony has developed a much different understanding of the game over the past 24 months than the one he had in Denver. He’s still an isolation heavy player, but he’s no longer someone that will jack up contested mid-range jumpers even if the defense sends help.

I wrote back in November about how his permanent shift to power forward makes Anthony looks so much like Dirk Nowitzki did during that 2011 title run and it rings true every time he takes the floor. Now Anthony is subconsciously aware of every consequence he can hand the defense if they commit two defenders to him; he breaks down where the help is coming from and makes the right pass based on how the defense will rotate to get back into position. It helps that Anthony has players like Jason Kidd and Raymond Felton on the wings, two players that have done a great job swinging the ball from side to side off his passes this season, but it all starts with opponents having to send to players at Carmelo in fear of what he might do in one-on-one situations.

Erik Spoelstra toyed with a one-on-one scheme against Anthony a few days ago when Wade and James were both out. Miami decided to make Anthony beat them and didn’t send any help on his isolations. Anthony responded by scoring 50 points on 18-of-26 shooting from the field and 7-of-10 shooting from three. While some would just give up on the idea of sticking just one man on him when he’s that hot, it may be the sounder idea. Some SportVu analysis tells us that the Knicks have an effective field goal percentage of 61% off of Carmelo’s passes over the past two seasons (at least when this column was posted) and I’m sure the numbers are just as good or even better on his hockey passes.

Anthony is still a lacking defensive player, but the move to power forward has not only helped him offensively with mismatches; defensively he’s facing off against less potent perimeter scorers and he’s been excellent when going one-on-one in the post this season. Per Synergy, he’s allowed just .683 points per possession on post-ups this season and just 37% shooting. Of the 72 players that have defended at least 100 post-ups this season, Anthony ranks sixth in PPPa, just behind Marc Gasol and in font of guys like Josh Smith, Larry Sanders and Joakim Noah.

Anthony is not going to be putting up 40 points on a consistent basis in the playoffs, but he’s on a tear right now and it wouldn’t surprise me if he was scoring 30 a night in the post-season. And with the Knicks’ supporting cast getting back in rhythm from beyond the arc, that puts opponents in a hell of a predicament. A Carmelo that is making an above average percentage of his threes, being more selective with his mid-range jumpers, attacking consistently and understands spacing and defensive rotations is one capable of carrying his team on a deep post-season run, and I am not sure that was true about any of the previous iterations of Melo’s game.

You could see the growth of Carmelo’s game from day one this season, so it is not surprising to see him reach this point – where he is a true triple threat (even with a career low assist rate). It is, however, shocking to see what J.R. Smith has turned into over the past month. Smith seemed to be having a blast chucking away contested 22-footers when Carmelo was out, and the Knicks had to live with it because that was their only way of creating shots for a good while.

But with Anthony back, Smith has turned into a much more efficient player. He’s averaging 23.8 points per game (17.8 for the season), getting to the line 7.5 times a night (3.9), shooting 49% from the field (42%) and the Knicks are scoring an amazing 120 points per 100 possessions with him on the floor (108.5) during this winning streak, and he’s doing so by being more aggressive with the ball rather than always settling for jumpers.

jrsmithstreak

Take a look at these two shot charts. You can see that Smith is getting into the paint much more often than he did during the 10-game stretch that featured him as the primary scoring option, and he’s also making a higher percentage of his jumpshots. He’s getting into a better rhythm by attacking more and defenses are having to play him as a dual threat rather than simply playing him as an isolation jumpshooter.

Here’s a play from Wednesday’s game between the Knicks and Hawks that showcases the growth of both Anthony and Melo.

Watch how Anthony patiently waits as the Hawks accidentally triple team him on his standard mid-post isolation and makes a great skip pass to J.R. Smith, who gets to play one-on-one on the right side of the floor against a defender that will close out on him as a shooter. Smith uses this to his advantage and blows by Josh Smith, who gambled for a steal and was out of position, for a wide open dunk. Smith would have taken that shot a month ago, but now he’s committed to making strong drives to the rim.

And finally, the Knicks would not be complete without an aggressive point guard like Raymond Felton setting the tone for the team. Felton has been a microcosm of the Knicks’ season this year, and he truly is the X-factor for New York. When he plays well, so does the team, because his dribble penetration opens up lanes for his teammates and forces opposing help defenders to start diving down into the paint to stop his drives, leaving those shooters and their swing passes to pick their rotations apart.

SegmentFGMFGAFG%3PM3PA3PT%
Games 1-106.414.643.8%1.94.542.2%
Games 11-206.516.838.7%1.84.639.1%
Games 21-306.016.336.8%.73.321.2%
Games 31-404.710.843.5%1.13.234.4%
Games 41-505.211.445.6%1.44.134.1%
Games 51-604.99.551.6%1.53.444.1%

The ebbs and flows of the Knicks’ season align with Felton’s stretches of up-and-down production. Take a look at this heat map of Felton’s shot selection in wins and in losses.

feltonheatchart

As you can see, the more Felton has shot, the more the Knicks have won. The biggest difference comes on those wing threes. When Felton is comfortably stepping into those shots, the Knicks tend to have more success because it means either their pick-and-roll attack is working or that the ball is swinging around the perimeter for good looks off of Carmelo isolations.

Felton has been a tremendous fit for this Knicks team because he is good at creating offense out of the pick-and-roll and because he’s really adapted to his off-ball role when it is Carmelo time; Felton has knocked down his fair share of threes (and he’s been excellent during those good stretches) and he knows when to swing the ball to get a better shot. According to Synergy, Felton shots 43% off pick-and-rolls this season, which is better than guys like Stephen Curry, Russell Westbrook and Kyrie Irving (of course, those guys tend to shoot more threes off the bounce, so their PPP value is a bit higher). When he gets into the paint it seems like the Knicks always seem to benefit somehow, whether he scores himself, he dishes to a teammate or Tyson Chandler dunks home his missed floater on a pseudo alleyoop.

It has been the development of these three players that has propelled the Knicks on this 12-game winning streak, a tear that has them as the favorite to lockdown the two seed in the East. A second seed finish would likely mean a date with the Celtics in the first round. While I think Boston has a sneaky quality to them right now, if I were to guess, I think we’ll be seeing a Knicks-Heat matchup in the Eastern Conference Finals.

That will be the final test for this New York team. They’ve handled the Heat well this season, but I think we’ve all been expecting Miami to ramp up their defensive intensity and their focus on that end when the post-season arrives. With two of the league’s elite defensive players in Shane Battier and LeBron James to throw at Carmelo and a cast of defensive minded players that can rotate on a whim when they’re at their best, the Heat will be a tough team to exploit in the playoffs.

We know it’s not impossible, though, because the Mavs did it two years ago. Dallas’ emergence that season caught everyone off guard that post-season, but we’ve seen the signs with New York. Now it’s time to see if the Knicks have it in them to execute the themes that have gotten to this point when the pressure is on.

Statistical support provided by NBA.com and Synergy Sports Technology.

Chris Davis Is Blasting Off

in MLB by
chrisdavis

As a sports fan, growing up in Corpus Christi was pretty rough. The only local sports team was a minor league hockey team called the Ice Rays and the only high school talent was in baseball. The pro teams that the city is geographically tied to are solid, but my family forced them on me so much that I found it impossible to root for the Spurs and Cowboys. Only the Astros, led by my favorite player Jeff Bagwell, captured my fandom, but it didn’t take me long to abandon them for the Rangers once the Killer B-era had come and gone.

It wasn’t until 2005 that the city finally had a real team to call it’s own in the form of a minor league baseball team. Nolan Ryan’s son paved the way for the team, as the Round Rock Express became the Astros’ triple-A affiliate, opening the door for the Corpus Christi Hooks to replace them as the double-A affiliate. I was actually the first fan ever to attend a Hooks game and I remember being confused by all of the photographers snapping my picture as I had my ticket scanned at the gate.

Even though this was a very dry stretch in the history of the Astros farm system, I still had fun going to games to see the young talent that the Athletics and Rangers had in their system. The 2008 season was my favorite because the Frisco RoughRiders were featuring prospects Elvis Andrus and Chris Davis.

One summer night I moseyed my way down to the front row seats by the visitors’ on-deck circle despite having a $5 general admission ticket meant for the outfield berm. This particular seat was right in between the homeplate netting and the visitor’s dugout, so I was literally within arm’s reach of the players.

Andrus was the player that I had heard the most about, but Davis had made me a fan with his previous displays of power against the Hooks. Now, back then I was much more an autograph seeker than a journalist¹, but for whatever reason I decided to ask Davis a couple of questions the next time he was on-deck. Amazingly, instead of pretending all of the chatter in the crowd was white noise, Davis responded when I asked him when he would be in the majors.

“Soon,” he said with a smirk.

There was some more small talk throughout the night, but all I can remember is him hitting a homerun onto an empty right field berm to clinch the game. It didn’t take much to win me over as a fan back then, so Davis immediately became one of my favorite players. I had to have him on every one of my fantasy teams, I made my 24th AIM screename in his honor (DavisChris19) and I had no problem proclaiming to anyone that asked (and those who didn’t) that he was going to be the next big thing in Texas.

Unfortunately for Davis, his time with the Rangers made him out to be the best example of a AAAA player. He showed great power during his three major league stints with the Rangers (80 games in 2008, 113 games in 2009 and 45 games in 2010), but he always ended up back in triple-A because he wasn’t getting the bat on the ball. My excitement each time Davis arrived to the majors was culled each time he departed back to Round Rock. Any time he was in the minors, Davis was good for a .325+ average and double digit jacks, but his sky high strikeout rates made him a tough player for the Rangers to keep in the line-up.

In 2011, with Mitch Moreland assuming the first base role, the Rangers decided to part ways with Davis, packaging him with pitcher Tommy Hunter in exchange for Koji Uehara, who provided them with solid bullpen work for two seasons. It was a sad day for me, watching my favorite team trade away one of my favorite players, a player that I still had faith in.

The trade turned out to be bittersweet. Though the Rangers had given up on him, he was finally going to get a chance to play everyday for a team that was not relying heavily on his development into a star. There was tremendous pressure on Davis to be a star in Texas, particularly when they had Justin Smoak and Moreland behind him and getting better. In Baltimore, he was simply a power hitting first baseman with a chance to stake his claim as a major league regular for a team that wasn’t expected to be good.

And that is what he did last season. In 139 games and 562 plate appearances, Davis hit 33 homeruns, slugged .501 (29th in baseball) and posted a .231 isolated slugging percentage (19th in baseball, just ahead of Albert Pujols). He also hit .270, his highest average since he hit .285 in his hot rookie stretch with the Rangers in 2008 (80 games). Davis still posted a horrid 30.1% strikeout rate (fifth worst in baseball), but a team finally gave him a shot to stay in the line-up in spite of his whiffing, and he repaid the Orioles by blasting the 10th most homers in baseball and producing 2 WAR (wins above replacement).

And now, just four games into the 2013 season, Davis is already halfway to the career best 2 WAR mark that he posted last year. That’s because Davis has started off this season on a tear unlike any other in the history of baseball. Davis is 9-of-15 at the plate (.600 average) with four homers and 16 RBI to start the season. He has homered once in each of the Orioles’ first four games, making him the fourth player in MLB history to do so alongside Willie Mays, Mark McGwire* and Nelson Cruz**. His 16 RBI put Davis in a category all by himself as that is the most runs batted in for any player in the first four games of a season.

Adding to the value of this red hot streak has been the timing of Davis’ hits. With the Orioles up one in their season opener against the Rays, Davis blasted a three-run homer in the seventh to give them a much needed cushion in a three-run win. In the rubber match of that series, Davis delivered a two-run homer in the second inning to give Baltimore a 2-0 lead and then broke the 2-2 tie in the 6th inning with a two RBI double. Yesterday, in the eighth inning, after Adam Jones tied the game at 5 with an RBI single, Davis stepped to the plate with the bases loaded and cracked a game-winning grandslam.

I’ll spare you the notes about sample size and sustainability and note that I understand that four awesome games doesn’t mean much if the rest of the season goes poorly. But that doesn’t mean that this incredible run, which you can actually date back to the end of the regular season last year, isn’t a significant event for Davis that signifies a new chapter in his career, specifically the fact that he has pounded outside pitches this season, something that had previously been a weakness. At the age of 27, Davis may very well be hitting his peak, and with tweaks to his plate approach, he can easily be one of the game’s premier sluggers.

Davis’ approach at the plate will be something to monitor over the next few weeks. If there is even a mild reduction in his strikeout rate, there’s reason to believe that he’s turned a corner. For a player that has gone through a lot to get to this point – where all the headlines are about him and everyone of his at-bats is must see TV for any baseball fan – you know he is has worked for that to be the case.

“There were times when it was really hard to go out on a baseball field and grind out four at-bats. But you learn from that,” Davis told the Baltimore Sun after yesterday’s game. “You remember that. And it keeps you humble. That’s one of the big things in this game. You can be as hot as wildfire one minute and cold as ice the next minute. You’ve just got to ride out the highs and grind out the lows. I think a lot of things that happened to me when I was younger, my hot start with Texas as a rookie [in 2008] and then struggling and going back and forth, I just really learned a lot about myself. Not only as a player but as a person.”

So: Is this historic run by Davis another quick peek at his potential with a long valley soon to come, or has Davis overcome his existential lows and developed into a top notch player that will get used to extended periods of success rather than failure?

I’m not sure, but I think we’ll know soon.

And I, like always, will be rooting for Davis to have finally arrived for good.


1. Had I known anything about journalism that year, Davis likely would have been my first professional interview. Instead, I took up sportswriting in 2009 and Rangers’ first base prospect Justin Smoak was my first interviewee (check out that camera work!). Return

* denotes steroid user.

** denotes accused steroid user.

Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Share with your friends










Submit
Go to Top